Tandia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by Bryce Courtenay

McArthur and Company, Toronto, Canada 1992

 

  • Hope is a flame that kindles new expectations by grasping at passing straws.
  • … simplicity is the key to almost everything. If something can be simply stated and simply understood, it will generally translate into a working concept. Law has chosen to neglect this fundamental truth and as a result has allowed itself to become reactionary, complicated and, for the most part, unjust.
  • The common law… is no longer simple or straightforward. Instead it is complicated, often obscure and usually costly, so it can be utilized for the most part only by the rapacious men who have devised it to keep title to wealth and property and to maintain power. Poor men cannot afford it and so find themselves condemned by it. Rich men, on the other hand, cannot afford to be without it and, indeed, use the law to avoid justice.
  • Detail is color and color is essential to most good argument.
  • … not too many notations in your essay on the thoughts of men long dead. Profundity is seldom achieved by misquoting the opinions of those who cannot return to defend themselves. It is an unfortunate habit cultivated by the more modest minds… who can only impress their peers by building a bulwark of old ideas. It disguises, of course, the absence of any new ones of their own. By all means use the quotes of the dead to clear the known ground, then dare to walk the wildest unknown path. In this way we can look forward to some intellectual progress.
  • … a sudden dawning realization that to survive, to live, you needed to hate.
  • Why was it that the most demented, the most evil scenario always seemed to be the most likely?
  • People were always seeing a conspiracy where none existed, making connections which where dubious to say the least.